Displaying items by tag: US Postal Service

WASHINGTON, DC — The U.S. Postal Service today announced the addition of the Innovation stamps to its 2020 stamp releases. Additional details, including the date these new Forever stamps will be available to purchase, will be announced soon. All images are preliminary and are subject to change prior to printing.

This release celebrates the American spirit of innovation with a pane of 20 stamps featuring five different designs, each representing an area in which U.S. scientists and engineers have made significant contributions: computing, biomedicine, genome sequencing, robotics and solar technology. Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the stamps, choosing a detail of an existing photograph for each.

Postal Products

Customers may purchase stamps and other philatelic products through The Postal Store at usps.com/shopstamps, by calling 800-STAMP24 (800-782-6724), by mail through USA Philatelic, or at Post Office locations nationwide. Forever stamps will always be equal in value to the current First-Class Mail 1‑ounce price. A variety of stamps and collectibles also are available at ebay.com/stamps.

Information on ordering first-day-of-issue postmarks and covers is at usps.com/shopstamps under “Collectors.”

Source: USPS announces new stamps celebrating innovation – Newsroom – About.usps.com

Published in News

Love is celebrated with Made of Hearts, the latest stamp in the U.S. Postal Service’s Love series, available now. This heart-filled design is just right for thank-you notes, get-well cards or any occasion when love is the perfect message. A dedication ceremony for the stamp was held today at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis.

Made of Hearts Forever stamp is just right for thank-you notes, get-well cards or any occasion when love is the perfect message.

Made of Hearts Forever stamp is just right for thank-you notes, get-well cards or any occasion when love is the perfect message.“While issued in time for Valentine’s Day, these stamps need no special holiday,” said David E. Williams, USPS chief operating officer and executive vice president. “Used as an expression of friendship, romance, encouragement, or simply ‘thinking of you,’ the Made of Hearts stamps will deliver your message in style.”

The connection between sentiment and the heart symbol is at least as old as the ancient Greeks. Images of ivy, grape and fig leaves — all shaped like the heart — were crafted in art and on pottery to symbolize abiding love. Use of the heart as an expression of romantic constancy is also reflected in the concept of courtly love that was the fashion in the Middle Ages.

Today, the heart is used to signify more than romantic or eternal love. Hearts are featured in many slogans that denote a love of place and in the logo designs of many businesses and organizations. A favorite motif in art, hearts are design elements frequently found on furniture, jewelry, textiles, shoes and clothing. The heart is universally understood to symbolize devotion, affection and love.

Made of Hearts stamp artwork features horizontal lines of red and pink hearts on a white background. Toward the center, red hearts in varying sizes replace pink hearts in a formation that creates one large red heart, the focal point of this graphic design. Antonio Alcalá designed the stamp and was art director for this project.

News of the Made of Hearts stamp is being shared with the hashtag #LoveStamps.

Postal Products

Made of Hearts is being issued as a Forever stamp in panes of 20. This Forever stamp is always equal in value to the current First-Class Mail 1-ounce price.

Customers may purchase stamps and other philatelic products through The Postal Store at usps.com/shop, by calling 800-STAMP24 (800-782-6724), by mail through USA Philatelic, or at Post Office locations nationwide.

Information on ordering first-day-of-issue postmarks and covers is at usps.com/shop.

Source: postalnews.com

Published in News

The U.S. Postal Service will dedicate a stamp honoring golfer Arnold Palmer (1929–2016), who rose from humble beginnings to become a champion. With drive and charisma, he helped transform a game once seen as a pastime for the elite into a sport enjoyed by the masses.

During a nearly decade-long period beginning in 1958, Palmer led the Professional Golfers’ Association of America (PGA) Tour in yearly money winnings four times; won the Vardon Trophy, awarded to the player with the lowest scoring average, four times; and twice earned PGA Player of the Year honors.

In 1964, he won his seventh and final major. The six U.S. Ryder Cup teams of which he was a member won the biennial international competition. He captained the team twice, first as a player in 1963, then in 1975. Overall, Palmer won 62 PGA Tour events, the fifth-most of all time, and 92 tournaments worldwide.

The stamp features James Drake’s action photograph of Palmer at the 1964 U.S. Open at Congressional Country Club in Bethesda, MD. Palmer’s name appears in the top left corner and the words “Forever” and “USA” are printed along the bottom of the left edge.

Art director Antonio Alcalá designed the stamp.

The Arnold Palmer stamp is being issued as a Forever stamp, which will always be equal in value to the current First-Class Mail 1-ounce price.

Who:
The Honorable Roman Martinez IV, U.S. Postal Service Board of Governors
When:
Wednesday, March 4, 2020, at 11:15 a.m. EST
Where:
Arnold Palmer Invitational Presented by Mastercard
Bay Hill Club & Lodge
9000 Bay Hill Blvd.
Orlando, FL 32819

Source: postalnews.com

Published in News

The U.S. Postal Service today announced that a semipostal stamp to help raise funds for those diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is being issued Dec. 2 at McGlohon Theater at Spirit Square in Charlotte, NC.

The Healing PTSD semipostal stamp features a photographic illustration of a green plant sprouting from the ground, which is covered in fallen leaves. The image is intended to symbolize the PTSD healing process. Art director Greg Breeding designed the stamp with original art by Mark Laita.

Tens of millions of Americans will experience PTSD in their lifetimes. Today, the nation is increasingly dedicated to compassionately treating this mental health issue.

While post-traumatic disorders have long been a subject of study, PTSD was not officially added to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a widely used reference guide published by the American Psychiatric Association, until the late 20th century.

The condition develops in some children and adults who have survived a traumatic event. Experiences such as a natural disaster, car accident, physical or sexual assault, abuse, and combat, among others, can trigger PTSD.

When the Healing PTSD semipostal stamp becomes available, it will be sold for 65 cents. The price includes the first-class single-piece postage rate in effect at the time of purchase plus an amount to fund PTSD research. By law, revenue from sales of the Healing PTSD semipostal stamp — minus the postage paid and the reimbursement of reasonable costs incurred by the Postal Service — will be distributed to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

The Semipostal Authorization Act, Pub. L. 106–253, grants the U.S. Postal Service discretionary authority to issue and sell semipostal stamps to advance such causes as it considers to be ‘‘in the national public interest and appropriate.’’ Under the program, the Postal Service intends to issue semipostal stamps over a 10-year period, with each stamp to be sold for no more than two years. The Alzheimer’s semipostal stamp, issued Nov. 30, 2017, was the first. The Healing PTSD semipostal stamp is the second. Additional discretionary semipostal stamps have not yet been determined.

Under the Act, the Postal Service will consider proposals for future semipostals until May 20, 2023. The Federal Register notice outlining this program can be found at the following url: www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2016-04-20/pdf/2016-09081.pdf.

Proposals will only be considered if they meet all submission requirements and selection criteria. They may be submitted by mail to the following address:

Office of Stamp Services
Attn: Semipostal Discretionary Program
475 L’Enfant Plaza SW, Room 3300
Washington, DC 20260–3501
Suggestions may also be submitted in a single Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) file sent by email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Indicate in the Subject Line: Semipostal Discretionary Program.

Source: postalnews.com

Published in News

The US Postal Service thought it would be an exciting idea to intentionally “misprint” some of its recent “Inverted Jenny” commemorative stamps, with the famous upside down biplane flying right side up.

But it seems that stamp collectors, the intended audience, are not impressed. A commentary in this week’s Linn’s Stamp News by Scott catalog editor Charles Snee says the gimmick “exposes the lack of understanding that the Postal Service exhibits toward the hobby and collectors”.

Letters to the editor from collectors agreed, with one reader criticizing the USPS for “playing games with our hobby”, and another suggesting that the USPS had “finally shot itself in the foot”.

While the 100 “misprinted” panes will certainly rise in value thanks to their scarcity, that won’t be reflected in the Scott catalog, considered the bible of the stamp collecting hobby. Editor Snee noted when the stamps were announced that Scott’s listing policy excludes “intentional varieties created in small quantities”. As far as Scott is concerned, the “exciting” stamps will merit a mere footnote in the catalog.

Source: postalnews.com

Published in News
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